Aarhus University By-laws

Aarhus University By-laws 

In the event of any inconsistency between the Danish and English language versions of the document, the Danish version prevails

 

determined in accordance with Section 13 of the Danish Consolidation Act on Universities No. 695 of 22 June 2011 (the University Act).

 

 

Article 1

Status, mandate, foundation and goals

 

Status

1.-(1) Aarhus University is a government-financed, self-governing public sector institution.

(2) The university’s base and venue is the Municipality of Aarhus, Denmark. The university’s by-laws are subject to the approval of the Danish Minister for Science, Innovation and Higher Education.

Mandate

2.-(1) Aarhus University is responsible for conducting research and offering world-class research-based education and research-based consultancy services to public sector authorities, to disseminate knowledge of scientific and scholarly methodologies and results and to exchange knowledge and competences with society at large.

 

Foundation

3.-(1) Aarhus University is founded on the form of collaboration between academic disciplines which is characteristic of  universities within the European university tradition with a full range of university subjects and research areas.

(2) Aarhus University bases its activities on on the principles expressed in the Magna Charta of the European Universities, including independence, freedom of research, teaching and education, the mutual exchange of knowledge, cultural collaboration, and research-based teaching.

(3) Aarhus University respects research ethics, including the requirement of incorruptibility and reliability, openness to criticism and the repeated testing of research achievements and results.

(4) True to the history of its establishment, Aarhus University is committed to contributing to development within its region and local community.

 

Goals

4.-(1) Aarhus University's activities must be characterised by a high level of academic excellence, measured by national as well as international standards. Aarhus University must produce highly qualified graduates whose skills and competences are applicable both in Denmark and abroad, and the university's research activities must have a significant impact on international scientific and scholarly debate and international research collaboration in general.

(2) Aarhus University aims to contribute to the advancement of science and the increase of knowledge, unimpeded by prevailing scientific and societal orthodoxies. Aarhus University will therefore provide working conditions for its researchers which encourage creativity and a critical stance in relation to ideas and viewpoints which are perceived as established truths among researchers and the rest of society alike.

(3)Through its research and educational activities, Aarhus University aims to contribute to the promotion of development, growth and welfare. Aarhus University will therefore strive to make a significant contribution to society's development through its degree programmes, research, and exchange of knowledge with the rest of society.

(4) Aarhus University aims to make a significant contribution to our culture in a broader societal context. Therefore, Aarhus University will work to promote the vitality and diversity of cultural life through education, research and collaboration.

 

 

 

Article 2

Organisation

 

The Board, the rector and the senior management team

5.-(1) The Board is the supreme authority of the university.

(2)The rector heads the university within the framework set by the Board.

(3)The members of the senior management team are the rector, the pro-rector(s), the university director and the deans. The senior management team is responsible for the operation of the university under the rector's leadership as well as the realisation of the university's strategy and goals.

Main academic areas

6.-(1) The university is organised into main academic areas, each of which is headed by a dean. The Board determines the organisation of the main academic areas. A main academic area may be designated 'faculty' or 'school'.

 

Departments

7.-(1) A number of departments is established under each main academic area. The departments are primarily responsible for research, teaching and knowledge exchange activities. The Board determines the organisation of the departments. Each department is headed by a department head.

 

Schools

8.-(1) Schools whose primary responsibilities are teaching and development may be established under the main academic areas at the same organisational level as departments. Each school is headed by a director.

 


Centres

9.-(1) Centres, which are organisational units with special responsibilities in relation to specific research, teaching or research communication areas, may be established. Centres may be analogous to departments, in which case the centre director is granted powers analogous to those of a department head.

 

 

Academic councils

10.-(1) An academic council must be established for each main academic area. The academic councils are responsible for ensuring the academic freedom of the main academic areas and the co-determination and involvement of staff in questions related to academic matters.

 

 

Employer panels

11.-(1) For each main academic area, the rector must appoint one or more employer panels responsible for ensuring dialogue between the university and the professions on the quality of the university's degree programmes and their relevance to society.

 

Graduate schools and PhD committees

12.-(1) One or more graduate schools with responsibility for doctoral programmes must be established under each main academic area  A PhD committee must be established for each graduate school to ensure student and academic staff influence on doctoral education.

 

 

Boards of studies

13.-(1) A number of boards of studies must be established to ensure that degree programmes and teaching activities are planned, carried out and developed in cooperation with the directors of studies. In addition, the boards of studies must ensure student and staff co-determination and participation in education and teaching.

 

 

 

Article 3

The Board

 

Composition

14.-(1) The Board consists of a total of eleven members:

-             - Six members are external.

-             - Two members are elected by and among the academic staff.

-             - One member is elected by and among the university’s technical and administrative staff.

-             - Two members are elected by and among the university’s full-time students.

(2) The Board elects a chairman and a deputy chairman among the external members.

 

 

Required qualifications for members

15.-(1) The six external members are to be appointed by the Board on the basis of their qualifications, including relevant international experience, and not as representatives of special interests or specific organisations or sectors.

(2) The duty of the members of the Board is to assist the university in fulfilling its responsibilities and goals by virtue of their experience and insight into education, research, knowledge transfer and exchange, as well as research-based public sector consultancy.

(3) The appointed members must also  possess collective experience in the areas of management, organisation and finance, including the evaluation of budgets and accounts.

(4) When appointing Board members, an emphasis must be placed on ensuring that the members are familiar with and respect the Danish university tradition of autonomy, freedom of research and the involvement of scientific and scholarly expertise in society's decision-making processes.

(5) When appointing Board members, an emphasis must be placed on ensuring that they will be capable of strengthening the university’s legitimacy and reputation in the eyes of society through their professional networks and authority.

(6) Special emphasis must be placed on ensuring that the composition of the Board enables it to enter into development contracts with the minister and to create an appropriate framework for the university’s academic and financial development and renewal in a manner which is based on the university’s core activities and competences, and which reflects the university's breadth of expertise and potential for development.

 

 

 

Appointment of external members

16.-(1) The Board as a whole constitutes the appointment organ responsible for selecting new external Board members among the nominated candidates.

(2) The Board appoints a nominating body consisting of the chairman of the Board and an additional member selected by the Board, two members selected by the chairs of the academic councils among the university's academic staff, as well as two members selected among the members of the university's employer panels, advisory panels and advisory boards.  The nominating body may propose candidates for consideration by the Board in addition to those which have been proposed in other ways. The chairman of the Board directs the meetings of the nominating body. The nominating body is responsible for nominating the appropriate number of candidates for consideration by the Board.

(3) Nominations of external Board members are to be made on the background of proposed candidates solicited from (among other sources) the academic councils, the Board members, the advisory boards, the employer panels and advisory panels and by advertisement on the university website, cf. subsection (2).

(4) The external members of the Board are normally appointed for a four-year term. The maximum term for an external Board member is eight years over at least two appointments.

(5) The term of service for the Board members must be determined in such a way that a number of external members are appointed every second year. If an external Board member resigns from the Board during his or her term, the Board decides whether to appoint a new member for the remainder of the term, or whether to appoint the new member for a new four-year term.

 

Election of internal members

17.-(1) The election of members to the Board must take the form of an election between slates, with the option of entering into electoral pacts. Detailed rules must be set out in the election rules.

(2) The representatives of the academic staff, including PhD students employed by the university, must be elected by and among the full-time employees for a term of four years.

(3) The technical and administrative staff representative must be elected by and among these staff members for a term of four years.

(4) The student representatives must be elected by and among the full-time students for a term of one year.

(5) Members are eligible for re-election, but the total term of service may not exceed eight years.

(6) If an elected member resigns from the Board during his/her term of service, and no alternate member has been elected, a new member is to be elected for the remainder of the term of service of the member concerned under the same rules as those which applied to the original election.

 

Responsibilities of the Board

18.-(1)  The Board is the university's highest authority and performs the functions assigned to it by Sections 10-11 and 13 of the University Act.

(2) The Board is charged with ensuring staff and student co-determination and participation in significant decisions. This is ensured by virtue of staff and student participation in the work of the Board, the academic councils and forums, PhD committees, boards of study, liaison committees, and other organs, cf. Article 5.

 

Openness about the Board's activities

19.-(1) Board meetings are open to the public. However, cases may be considered behind closed doors if the nature of the matter concerned or the circumstances in general render this necessary. All personnel cases, cases including information about contract negotiations with private individuals or similar negotiations with public sector partners, and cases covered by legal provisions concerning confidentiality in public administration, must be considered behind closed doors.

(2)  The material distributed to the Board for each meeting, including agendas and minutes, must be made publicly available – subject to applicable legal provisions.

(3) Cases covered by the rules on to confidentiality in public administration must not be made public. A document or information relating to a confidential case must, however, be made publicly available in accordance with subsection (1) provided the document and information are not confidential in their own right.

(4) Personnel cases and cases including information about contract negotiations with private individuals or similar negotiations with public sector partners may be exempt from the requirement that documents relating to Board meetings must be made publicly available if the nature of the case concerned or the circumstances in general render this necessary. A document or information relating to a case that is subject to (1) must, however, be made publicly available in accordance with subsection (1) , unless publication would create serious conflict with the considerations non-disclosure under subsection (1) is intended to protect.

(5) Cases, including documents and information relating to these cases,which are considered behind closed doors, cf. subsection (1) item 2, may be exempt from the requirement that Board meeting material must be made public if the nature of the case concerned or the circumstances in general render this absolutely necessary.

(6) By arrangement with the chairman of the Board, the rector makes information concerning the work and decisions of the Board publicly available.

(7) The Board must adopt rules of procedure. The rules of procedure may include a procedure for the organisation of Board meetings.

 

 

Article 4

Advisory bodies

 

Advisory boards

20.-(1) On the basis of  proposals submitted by the deans, the rector must establish advisory boards at the main academic areas for which these are required in order to achieve or retain significant international accreditations of degree programmes, or where required by other central activities of the main academic area.

(2) An advisory board must consist of external members who represent the target audience for the main academic area's research, degree programmes and knowledge dissemination activities, as well as the sphere of research and education. An advisory board must include a significant proportion of members who have received their degrees from other institutions of higher learning and who have an international perspective on research, education and knowledge dissemination.

(3) The dean is responsible for keeping the advisory board informed of the development and strategy of the main academic area, and is advised by it in turn in relation to the following issues:

1)      The overall strategy of the main academic area

2)      The development of degree programmes, including questions of supply and demand.

3)      The quality of the research performed, with special focus on relationships to national and international research cultures.

4)      The effectiveness of knowledge exchange activities, with a special focus on the main academic area's general ability to provide society with the knowledge and insight it requires.

 

Employer panels and advisory panels

21.-(1) For each main academic area, following recommendation by the dean, the rector must appoint one or more employer panels consisting of external members. Together the members must have experience with and knowledge of the field of study in question and the professions for which degrees in the field prepare graduates.

(2) The university ensures dialogue between the employer panels and the university regarding the quality of its degree programmes and their relevance to society, and includes the employer panels in the development of new and existing programmes and the development of new methods of teaching and evaluation.

(3) The employer panel may issue statements and make recommendations to the university on all matters relating to the field of study in question. The employer panel must issue statements regarding all questions submitted to it by the university.

(4) Advisory panels with representatives of other areas which receive services other than education from the university may be established.

 

 

Article 5

Academic councils and academic forums

 

Academic councils

Composition

22.-(1) An academic council must be established for each main academic area, consisting of the dean along with representatives of the academic staff, including PhD students employed at the university and students, cf. section 15, subsection (4) of the University Act. Observers are also elected to represent the technical-administrative personnel.

(2) On the recommendation of the dean of the main academic area, the rector determines the size and composition of the council for the coming electoral period. An academic council must have a minimum of eight and a maximum of twenty-two members, excluding the dean and observers representing technical-administrative personnel.

(3) There must be at least two PhD student representatives on each academic council. PhD students who are employed by the university are considered members of academic staff, while PhD students who are not employed by the university are considered students.

(4) When determining the size and composition of an academic council, every effort should be made to ensure that its academic staff members (including PhD students employed by the university) represent a broad range of fields, and that as far as possible, all departments are represented

(5) The number of student representatives should represent 25 per cent of the number of academic staff representatives (including PhD students employed by the university) including the dean. If the resulting figure is a fraction, it should be rounded up to the next whole figure. Representatives who are PhD students not employed by the university should not be included in the 25 per cent.

(6) Three academic council observers are to be elected by and from among the technical and administrative staff.

(7) Representatives of the academic staff and observers from the technical and administrative staff are elected for four-year terms. Student representatives are elected for one-year terms..

 

Responsibilities

23.-(1)  An academic council has the following functions:

1)      To ensure innovation, quality, transparency and legitimacy in all decisions on academic matters.

2)      To participate in selecting members for consideration by the nomination body in the context of the appointment of external Board members and the nomination of members of advisory bodies in the context of appointments to the posts of rector, pro-rector, dean and vice-dean. Selection and nomination at university level takes place through the academic council chairman's assembly.

3)      To select members for the university-wide advisory forums, cf. section 35(4).

4)      To advise the dean on budgetary priorities.

5)      To make pronouncements to the dean on the internal distribution of funding.

6)       To make pronouncements to the dean on key strategic research questions and educational issues and plans for knowledge exchange.

7)       To make recommendations to the dean on the composition of academic committees to assess applicants for academic positions.

8)       To award doctoral (PhD) and higher doctoral (stordoktor) degrees.

 

(2) The dean must ensure staff co-determination in relation to academic matters broadly defined by involving staff in a consistent and timely fashion. The dean is therefore obligated to discuss matters of significance in the areas of research, talent development, knowledge exchange and education with the academic councils.

(3) The academic councils may make statements on all academic matters of substantial relevance to the activities of the university and have a duty to discuss academic issues presented by the rector or the dean for its consideration.

(4) The academic councils have the right to address the senior management team. 

 

Organisation

24.-(1) Each academic council should select a chairman among the elected representatives of academic staff. The dean may not be selected as chairman. The chairman chairs meetings and is responsible for preparing meeting agendas in cooperation with the dean.

(2) The dean participates in the meetings of the academic councils and is responsible for preparing meeting agendas in cooperation with the chairman.

(3) The chairman and the dean are responsible for ensuring the preparation of an annual schedule and meeting plan so as to ensure that all relevant matters are discussed in good time and as planned. The annual schedule should include annually recurring matters such as the main academic area's strategy, discussions of matters of principal, the budget, hiring and recruitment policy and professor policy.

(4) As a general rule, the academic councils should meet six times annually with a minimum of four annual meetings.

(5) The vice-deans should participate in academic council meetings as required.

 

 

Academic council functions at university level

 

 

25.-(1) The chairmen of the academic councils constitute the chairmen's assembly.

(2) The chairmen's assembly holds meetings with the senior management team one to two times annually. At these meetings, the chairmen present a report containing an overview of the activities of the academic councils in the period since the previous meeting, and the senior management team informs the chairmen about issues of relevance for the academic councils, with a particular emphasis on coming initiatives.

(3) The senior management team may involve the chairman's assembly in connection with discussions of specific cases.

(4) The senior management team may solicit advice from the chairman's assembly in connection with appointments.

(5) The chairman's assembly may act as spokesperson for the academic councils and meets with the senior management team regularly, cf. subsection (2).

(6) The chairmen have a duty to inform the academic councils about discussions which take place in the chairman's assembly.

(7) In connection with the Board's review of the annual report, the Board invites the senior management team and the chairmen of the academic councils to account for the activities of the academic councils.

 

Departmental councils 

Composition

26.-(1) Each department must establish a departmental council composed of the head of department along with academic staff representatives, including PhD students employed by the university, as well as technical-administrative staff and students.

(2) The head of department is responsible for determining the size and structure of the council as well as the length of the term to be served by elected members. The size of the council must be appropriate for it to perform its functions. The maximum size of a departmental council is twenty-five members.

(3) The composition of each council must take into account the size, composition and diversity of the department, and academic staff, PhD students, technical-administrative staff and students should all be adequately represented.

(4)  The size and structure of the council as well as the length of the term to be served by elected members must be approved by the dean.

(5) Staff and student representatives are to be elected in local elections.

 

Responsibilities

27.-(1) The functions of the departmental functions are:

1)      To ensure innovation, quality, transparency and legitimacy in all decisions on academic matters.

2)      To ensure the academic and social identity and cohesion of the department.

(2) The head of department must ensure staff co-determination in relation to academic matters broadly defined by involving staff in a consistent and timely fashion. The head of department is therefore obligated to discuss matters of significance in the areas of research, talent development, knowledge exchange and education with the departmental council.

(3) The departmental council may make pronouncements on all academic matters of substantial relevance to the activities of the department and has a duty to discuss academic issues presented by the dean or the head of department for its consideration.

(4) The departmental councils have the right to address the dean.

 

 

Organisation

28.-(1) The head of department is the chairman of the departmental council. The departmental council selects a deputy chairman among the academic staff representatives. The head of department chairs meetings and is responsible for calling meetings and preparing agendas in cooperation with the deputy chairman.

(2) The head of department and the deputy chairman are responsible for ensuring the preparation of an annual schedule and meeting plan so as to ensure that all relevant matters are discussed in good time and as planned.  The annual schedule should include annually recurring matters such as the department's strategy, discussions of matters of principal, the budget, hiring and recruitment policy, professor policy, the physical and social environment at the department, co-determination and the development of managerial structures and forms, as well as students' environment and well-being.

(3) The departmental councils must meet regularly.

 

 

Department-like schools and centres

29.-(1) The rules on departmental councils apply to department-like schools and centres.

 

 

 

Article 6

The rector and other members of senior management

The rector

30.-(1) The Board appoints and dismisses the rector and, on the recommendation of the rector, appoints and dismisses the pro-rector(s) and the university director.

 

31.-(1) The rector is appointed following external advertising according to the current rules regarding advertisements for  appointments in the Danish state.

(2) The rector must be a recognised researcher, cf. the Danish Act on Research Consulting, within one of the university's fields of research, and must have insight into the educational sector. The rector must be an experienced manager and organiser of research environments and understand the nature of the university’s activities and its relationship with the society of which it is a part.

(3) The appointment procedure must ensure that the rector has academic and managerial legitimacy. With this in mind, the procedure must be organised so as to ensure that general support can be expected from the university for the Board’s decision regarding the appointment to the position of rector.

(4) The entire Board may take part in the appointment procedure, or the Board  may establish an appointment committee involving a number of its members to draft an advertisement, select candidates for interview, carry out interviews and submit a recommendation to the Board regarding the appointment.

(5) The appointment committee, cf. subsection (4) above, must consist of the chairman of the Board and representatives of the external members of the Board, the academic staff, the technical and administrative staff, and the students.

(6) The board appoints an advisory group consisting of an academic staff representative from each main academic area, a technical-administrative staff representative and a student. The members are nominated by the academic council chairman's assembly  The chairman of the Board chairs the group's meetings. The group is briefed about draft advertisements of vacant positions and about the pool of applicants. The group is presented with any relevant applications which have been received and advises the Board or the appointment committee on which candidates should be invited to interview for the position.

(7) The board conducts interviews, and in this connection, may solicit internal or external support.

(8) The decision to appoint must be made by the entire Board.

(9) The Board may terminate the rector’s employment in accordance with the rules in section 29 of the University Act.

 

 

The rector's responsibilities

32.-(1) The rector represents the university outwardly. The rector is responsible for the management of the university within the framework established by the Board, cf. section 14, subsection (1) of the University Act.

(2) This means that the rector is responsible for:

1)      Making decisions in all cases not assigned to the Board, academic councils, boards of studies or PhD committees under the University Act.

2)      Making recommendations to the Board regarding the appointment and dismissal of pro-rector(s) and the university director.

3)      Appointing and dismissing deans.

4)      Hiring and dismissing the heads of academic divisions within the university, unless responsibility is delegated.

5)      Establishing graduate schools and appointing the heads of graduate schools, unless responsibility is delegated.

6)      Determining the university's internal structure within the framework set by the Board.

7)      Submitting the budget to the Board and signing the accounts.

8)      Establishing rules regarding disciplinary measures for students.

9)      Signing on behalf of the university, apart from decisions concerning real property.

10)   Approving all external partnerships of a binding nature for the university.

11)   Ensuring that guidelines are in place for documentation systems in connection with evaluations and follow-up.

12)   Ensuring the quality of the university's degree programmes, teaching, research and knowledge exchange activities.

(3) The rector authorises other managers to act on behalf of the rector within their respective areas. The rector may also authorise other employees to act on his or her behalf in particular areas. Under special circumstances, the rector may require a full-time member of academic staff to assume a managerial position on a temporary basis.

(4) The rector may establish advisory committees. The rector may ask advisory boards, employer panels,  boards of studies, PhD committees and academic councils and departmental forums to discuss and make pronouncements about topics of importance for the university.

(5) The rector prepares standard rules of procedure governing the academy councils, boards of studies, etc.

 

Pro-rectors

33.-(1) A pro-rector assists the rector in day-to-day management by arrangement with the rector.  If several pro-rectors are appointed, one of them shall act as the rector's deputy.

(2) Pro-rectors are appointed by the Board on the recommendation of the rector.

(3) Section 31(1), item 2, and subsections (3) and (8) above also apply to the appointment of pro-rectors. In addition, section18(2) item 1 above also applies to the appointment of the pro-rector who acts as the rector’s deputy.

(4) At the beginning of the hiring process, the rector appoints an advisory group consisting of an academic staff representative from each main academic area, a technical-administrative staff representative and a student. The members are nominated by the academic council chairman's assembly. The group is briefed about the draft advertisement, and about the pool of applicants. The group is shown any relevant applications that have been received and advises the rector about which candidates should be invited to attend an interview.

(5) The rector conducts interviews, and in this connection, may solicit internal or external support.

(6) The Board may terminate the pro-rector’s employment on the recommendation of the rector and in accordance with the rules in section 29 of the University Act.

 

The university director

34.-(1) The university director heads the administration of the university.

(2) The university director is appointed by the Board on the recommendation of the rector.

(3) The university director is appointed following external advertising according to the current rules regarding advertisements for  appointments in the Danish state. The university director must have experience in administration and management.

(4) At the beginning of the appointment process, the rector establishes an advisory group consisting of representatives of the university’s administrative staff. Its members are nominated by the deputy directors and the main liaison committee. The group is briefed about the draft advertisement, and about the pool of applicants. The group is shown any relevant applications that have been received and advises the rector about which candidates should be invited to attend an interview.

(5) The rector conducts interviews, and in this connection, may solicit internal or external support.

(6) The Board may terminate the pro-rector’s employment on the recommendation of the rector and in accordance with the rules in section 29 of the University Act.

 

Article 7

The senior management group

 

35.-(1) The senior management group consists of the rector, the pro-rector(s), the university director and the deans. Within the framework established by legislation and the Board and as determined by the rector, the senior management group is responsible for the day-to-day management of the university, the implementation of the university's strategy and the realisation of its goals. The rector is responsible for ensuring that the senior management group exercises coherent, unified management which promotes the interests and needs of the university as a whole and which ensures that Aarhus University acts and is perceived as a single unified institution.

(2)  Each dean is assigned special managerial responsibilities in connection with one of four university-wide strategic activities.

(3)  An advisory forum to support the management's work may be established for each strategic activity.

 

 

Article 8

Main academic area management

 

The deans

36.-(1) The rector appoints deans. Deans are appointed following external advertising according to the current rules regarding advertisements for  appointments in the Danish state.

(2) The dean must be a recognised researcher, cf. the Danish Act on Research Consulting, within one of the main academic area's research areas, and must have experience of and insight into education, management and the nature of the interaction of a university with society at large.

(3) The appointment procedure must ensure that the dean has academic and managerial legitimacy. With this in mind, the procedure should be designed to ensure that general support can be expected from the main academic area for the rector’s decision regarding the appointment to the position.

(4) At the beginning of the appointment process, the rector establishes an advisory group consisting of representatives of the main academic area's academic staff, technical and administrative staff, and students. The members are nominated by the academic council chairman's assembly. The group is briefed about the draft advertisement, and about the pool of applicants. The group is shown any relevant applications that have been received and advises the rector about which candidates should be invited to attend an interview.

(5) The rector conducts interviews, and in this connection, may solicit internal or external support.

(6) The rector may terminate a dean's employment in accordance with the rules in section 29 of the University Act.

 

 

The responsibilities of the deans

37.-(1) On the authority of the rector, the dean represents the main academic area and is responsible for its management.

(2) In addition, the dean has the following responsibilities, on the authority of the rector and within the framework of the cooperation which takes place in the senior management team, cf. section 35:

1)      Primary responsibility for the finances of the main academic area and overall responsibility for personnel management.

2)      Ensuring the coherence of the main academic area's degree programmes, teaching research and knowledge exchange activities.­

3)      Ensuring the quality of the main academic area's degree programmes, teaching, research and knowledge exchange activities.

4)      Responsibility for ensuring cooperative efforts to develop the quality of the university's degree programmes, teaching, research and knowledge exchange activities.

5)      Appointing and dismissing heads of department.

6)      Establishing graduate schools at the main academic area.

7)      Employing and dismissing heads of graduate schools.

8)      Establishing PhD committees and appointing chairmen and vice-chairmen, if applicable, for the PhD committees following the recommendation of the committee in question.

9)      Establishing boards of studies and approving the choice of chairmen and deputy chairmen of the boards of studies.

10)  Appointing and dismissing directors of study on the recommendation of the boards of study.

11)  Approving academic regulations as submitted by the board of studies.

(3) The dean is obligated to solicit the counsel of the academic councils, employer panels and advisory boards, cf. sections 20-24.

 

Vice-deans

38.-(1) Deans appoint one or more vice-deans who are subject to the rector’s approval. Vice-deans are appointed following external advertising according to the current rules regarding advertisements for  appointments in the Danish state.

(2) A vice-dean assists the dean in the day-to-day management of the main academic area by arrangement with the dean.

(3) The vice-dean must be a recognised researcher, cf. the Danish Act on Research Consulting, within one of the main academic area's research areas, and must have experience of and insight into education, management and the nature of the interaction of a university with society at large.

(4) The appointment procedure must ensure that the vice-deans have academic and managerial legitimacy.

(5) The dean may terminate a vice-dean's employment in accordance with the rules in section 29 of the University Act.

 

Article 9

The management of departments

 

 

 

The department heads

39.-(1) The deans appoint heads of department.

(2) Heads of department are appointed following external advertising according to the current rules regarding advertisements for  appointments in the Danish state.

(3) Heads of departments must have teaching experience and must be recognised researchers, cf. the Danish Act on Research Consulting, within one of the department's research areas or a field closely associated with the department.

(4) The appointment procedure must ensure that heads of department have academic and managerial legitimacy. With this in mind, the procedure should be designed to ensure that general support of the department's staff may be expected for the decision regarding the appointment to the position.

(5) At the beginning of the appointment process, the dean establishes an advisory group consisting of representatives of the department's academic staff, technical and administrative staff, and students. The members are nominated by the departmental forums. The group is briefed about the draft advertisement, and about the pool of applicants. The group is shown any relevant applications that have been received and advises about which candidates should be invited to attend an interview.

(6) The dean conducts interviews, and in this connection, may solicit internal or external support.

(7) The dean may terminate a department head's employment in accordance with the rules in section 29 of the University Act.

 

 

The responsibilities of the heads of department

40.-(1) The head of department represents the department externally and is responsible for the management of its academic affairs, finances and personnel.

(2) The head of department is responsible for the planning and distribution of the work duties and responsibilities to be carried out at the department, and may impose specific work on department employees. Academic staff enjoy freedom of research and, within the bounds of the university's research strategy, are free to perform independent research when not performing work as directed by department management. The framework of the university's research strategy applies to the entirety of the university. Academic staff may not be directed to perform specific tasks which require the entirety of their working hours over longer periods of time, which would in essence deprive them of their freedom of research.

(3) The head of department must ensure the quality, coherence and development of the department's degree programmes, teaching, research and knowledge exchange. With the involvement of the boards of studies and directors of studies, the head of department must follow up on evaluations of the department's degree programmes and teaching activities.

(4) The head of department must establish a departmental forum, and the head of department must involve the departmental forum and employer panels in the exercise of his or her managerial authority.

 

 

 

Article 10

The management of graduate schools

 

Graduate schools and PhD committees

41.-(1) The dean is responsible for establishing and abolishing graduate schools, the locus of doctoral education at the university.

(2) Each graduate school has a graduate school head who is appointed and dismissed by the dean. The head of the graduate school must be a recognised researcher and have experience with and insight into doctoral education. The dean solicits the necessary counsel to ensure that the appointment procedure leads to the appointment of heads of graduate schools with professional and managerial legitimacy.

(3) The head of the graduate school heads the graduate school. Responsibilities include:

1)      The approval of PhD students.

2)      The appointment of PhD supervisors.

3)      Organisation and planing of the graduate school's programmes, including study abroad.

4)      Performance of evaluations of the graduate school's activities on a regular basis and submission of recommendations to the dean regarding what steps should be taken to follow up on these evaluations.

 

 

PhD committees

42.-(1)  The dean must establish PhD committees with representatives elected by and among the academic staff and PhD studentsl to ensure student and academic staff influence on the programmes offered.

(2) Academic staff representatives are elected for three-year terms. PhD student  representatives are elected for one-year terms.

(3) The dean appoints chairmen and vice-chairmen, if applicable, for the PhD committees following the recommendation of the committee in question.

(4) The number of members is determined by the dean. A PhD committee may have a minimum of four and a maximum of twenty members. The academic scope of the graduate school is taken into consideration when determining the number of members and dividing the committee into different areas, if applicable.

(5) The duties and responsibilities of the PhD committee are described in section 16 b (2) of the University Act.

 

Article 11

Directors of studies and boards of studies

 

Directors of studies

43.-(1) The dean defines the directors of studies' responsibilities in relation to the structure of the board of studies.

(2) The dean appoints and dismisses directors of studies on the recommendation of the board(s) of studies in question. The director of studies must be appointed among the full-time academic staff. The appointments are for three-year terms. Directors of studies may serve several terms.

(3) In cooperation with the board of studies, the director of studies is responsible for the practical organisation of teaching, tests and other forms assessment which are included in examinations. The director of studies approves thesis proposals and the dates of submission for Master’s degree theses and accompanying plans for supervision of Master's thesis students.

 

Boards of studies

44.-(1) Boards of studies are established and abolished by the dean of the main academic area concerned after a public consultation involving the departments in question.

(2) Boards of studies governing one or more degree programmes may be established, just as boards of studies may be established at different levels. If boards of studies are established at different levels, the dean determines the division of responsibility among them.

(3) Boards of studies consist of an equal number of representatives of the academic staff and students. The number of members is determined by the dean. A board of studies may have a minimum of four and a maximum of eighteen members.

(4) The range of disciplines covered in the degree programme elements to be governed by the board of studies must be taken into account when determining the number of members it is to include. This should also be taken into account in the event that board of studies is to include subdivisions which represent different areas.

 

I den tidligere vedtægt var der også et max. på 18 medlemmer.

 

(5) The duties and responsibilities of the boards of studies are described in section 18(4) of the University Act.

 

45.-(1) Representatives of the academic staff on boards of studies are elected for three-year terms by and among the academic staff with teaching responsibilities in the area governed by the board of studies in question.

(2) Student representatives on the boards of studies are elected for one-year terms by and among the students in the area governed by the board of studies in question.

 

The chairman and the deputy chairman

46.-(1) The board of studies elects a chairman for a one-year term. The chairman may also act as director of studies. The chairman is elected among the full-time academic staff who are members of the board of studies.

(2) The board of studies elects a vice-chairman from among its student members. The vice-chairman takes part in organising the work of the board of studies.

(3) The elected chairman, deputy and vice-chairman must be approved by  the dean.

 

Article 12

Elections

 

47.-(1) The Board determines the rules for electing Board members, academic councils, PhD committees and boards of studies.

 

Article 13

Financial matters

 

48.-(1) The rector's signature binds the university, cf. subsection (2) below.

(2) The  signatures of the chairman of the Board and a member of the Board jointly bind the university in transactions involving real property.

 

49.-(1) The university may establish trusts for donated funds if requested by the donor.

 

 

Article 14

Special circumstances

 

50.-(1) Aarhus University was established by a merger of Aarhus University with the following formerly independent institutions: The Aarhus School of Dentistry, The Herning Institute of Business Administration and Technology, the Aarhus School of Business (Handelshøjskolen i Århus), the Danish University of Education, the Danish Institute of Agricultural Sciences, the National Environmental Research Institute and the Engineering College of Aarhus.

(2) Aarhus University is authorised to use the Danish term for 'business school' (handelshøjskolen).

 

51.-(1) In accordance with the Danish Appropriations Act and the agreement of 28 October 2010 between the government, the Social Democrats, the Danish People's Party and the Danish Social Liberal Party on the  allocation of the globalisation reserve for research and development 2011-2012, a PhD council has been established at Aarhus University. The PhD council is governed by a rider to these by-laws.

 

 

Part 15

Approval and entry into force

 

52.-(1) These by-laws may be amended by the Board. The university’s by-laws are subject to the approval of the Danish Minister for Science, Innovation and Higher Education.

 

53.-(1) These by-laws come into force when approved by the Minister.

(2)  The Aarhus University by-laws which were approved by the Minister for Science, Technology and Innovation on 16 May 2011, are at the same time repealed.

 

 

 

Approved by the Aarhus University Board on 29 February 2012.

Approved by the Minister for Science, Innovation and Higher Education on 21 June 2012.

 

 

 

Michael Christiansen

Chairman of the board, Aarhus University

 

 

 

Morten Østergaard

Minister for Science, Innovation and Higher Education

 

 

Rider to Aarhus University By-laws: on the establishment of a PhD council 

 

 

Background, legal status and jurisdiction

 

1.-(1)

 

In accordance with the Danish Appropriations Act and "Agreement between the government, the Social Democrats, the Danish People's Party, and the Danish Social Liberal Part on the allocation of the globalisation reserve for research and development 2011-2012" of 28 October 2010 (Annex 2, in Danish), referred to in the following as 'the agreement', a PhD council has been established at Aarhus University.

 

2.-(1)

 

While the PhD council is part of Aarhus University, it operates independently of the university's normal managerial structure in performing its functions, cf. section 3.

 

(2) The PhD council decides in cases related to the allocation of the globalisation funds, cf. section 3.

 

3.-(1)

 

The PhD council is responsible for the implementation of the globalisation funds described in the Danish Appropriations Act and the agreement. The globalisation funds are earmarked for research and doctoral education with a special focus on the exploration of means to ensure that the practice of the municipal primary and lower secondary school system produces the greatest possible benefit for all students, both academically and with regard to promoting well-rounded development, growth and a desire for further education. The globalisation funds must be awarded in accordance with the conditions set out in the Appropriations Act and the agreement, including the condition that globalisation funds must be awarded on the basis of applications submitted by consortiums consisting of at least one professional university college and one university.

 

(2) The PhD council establishes an international assessment committee whose members are nominated by the Danish Council for Independent Research and the Danish Council for Strategic Research. The PhD councils submit the applications under subsection (1) for assessment by the committee in order to obtain an expert evaluation of the level of research.

 

 

Composition, etc.

 

4.-(1)

 

The PhD council consists of a chairperson and ten additional members, all of whom are appointed for four-year terms. The chair is appointed by the Danish Minister for Science, Technology and Innovation. The additional members are appointed by the minister on the recommendation of the organisations referred to in subsection (2). Members may be appointed for an additional two-year term. Members may only be reappointed once.

 

(2) Members of the council are recommended by the following organisations, cf. subsection (1), item 3:

 

1)      Three members are recommended by Universities Denmark.

 

2)      Three members are recommended by the Rector's Conference - University Colleges Denmark.

 

3)      Two members are recommended by the relevant programme committee under the Danish Council for Strategic Research.

 

4)      Two members are recommended by Local Government Denmark (LGDK).

 

(3) The recommended members referred to in subsection (2), items 1 and 2, must represent the universities and the university colleges respectively. The nominated members referred to in subsection (2), items 3, must be internationally recognised authorities. The nominated members referred to in subsection (2), item  4, must represent relevant employers.

 

(4) The majority of the PhD council's members, including the chair, must be respected researchers with experience and understanding of doctoral education.

 

(5) If a member resigns before the end of his or her term of service, the minister appoints a new member in accordance with subsection (1), item 1. The new member may be appointed for less than four years, however.

 

(6) The PhD council is responsible for adopting rules of procedure for its activities.

 

 

Accounts

 

5.-(1)

 

Accounts must be prepared for the PhD council's activities. Under the University Act, the accounts must be included in Aarhus University's annual report.

 

 

Appeals and authority

 

6.-(1)

 

Legal questions regarding the decisions of the PhD council may be brought before the Danish University and Property Agency. The complainant must submit the appeal within two weeks of being informed of the decision.

 

(2) Decisions made by the Agency under subsection (1) may not be appealed to a higher administrative authority.

 

7.-(1)

 

This rider has been drafted under the statutory authority of the University Act, Section 10(6), Section 34(1) and (2), Section 36, and Section 36A.

 

(2) This rider comes into force when approved by the Minister.

 

 

Aarhus University, 28 January 2011

 

Jens Bigum

Chairman of the Board

 

Approved by the Minister for Science, Technology and Innovation on 22 February 2011