Rules and regulations of the University of Aarhus


Rules and regulations of the University of Aarhus

Established pursuant to section 10 subsection (6) of Act no. 403 of 28 May 2003 on Danish universities (the Universities Act, or universitetsloven )

Part 1 Objective

Current status

Article 1. The University of Aarhus is an independent public-sector institution. The University’s base and venue is in the Municipality of Århus. The University’s rules and regulations are subject to the approval of the Danish Minister for Science, Technology and Innovation.

Tasks

Article 2. The task of the University of Aarhus is to conduct research and provide research-based education complying with the highest international standards, to disseminate knowledge of academic methods and results, and to exchange knowledge and competencies with the society around it.

Foundation

Article 3. The University of Aarhus is based on the kind of working partnership between academic disciplines that characterises any university offering a fully developed range of subjects within European university traditions.

(2) The activities of the University of Aarhus are based on the principles expressed in the Magna Charta of the European universities, including independence, freedom of research, teaching and education, mutual exchange of knowledge, cultural partnerships, and teaching on a research base.

(3) The University of Aarhus respects ethical rules for conducting research, including demands for incorruptibility and reliability, openness to criticism, and the repeated testing of achievements and the results obtained.

(4) Owing to the history of its establishment, the University of Aarhus is committed to contributing to developments within its region and local community.

Goals

Article 4. The University of Aarhus wants its activities to have a high level of specialisation in both national and international terms. The University of Aarhus wants its graduates to be characterised by their quality and usefulness in Denmark and abroad, and its research to make its mark in the international academic debate and in research partnerships in general.

(2) The University of Aarhus wishes to develop the academic disciplines and make a critical contribution to the increase of knowledge without being tied to prevailing academic and social perceptions. Consequently, the University of Aarhus wishes to create conditions for its researchers that promote creativity and a critical attitude to opinions and viewpoints regarded as established truths in the world of research and society as a whole.

(3) The University of Aarhus wishes to use its research and education to help promote development, growth and welfare. Consequently, the University of Aarhus wants its degree programmes, research and interchange of knowledge with other areas of society to make a significant contribution to the development of society.

(4) The University of Aarhus wishes to be a significant cultural factor in a broader social context. Consequently, the University of Aarhus wishes to use its education, research and partnerships to promote lively and varied cultural activities.

Part 2 Organisation of the University

Board and rector

Article 5. The board is the supreme authority of the University.

(2) The rector manages the University within the framework laid down by the board.

Faculties

Article 6. The University is divided into five main areas or faculties: the Humanities (HUM), the Health Sciences (SUN), the Social Sciences (SAM), Theology (TEO) and Science (NAT).

(2) Each faculty is managed by a dean.

Institutes

Article 7. Each faculty is normally divided into institutes, which are the units in which research and teaching normally take place.

(2) Institutes are established and discontinued by the board on the recommendation of the rector following the recommendation of (or a hearing involving) the faculty concerned. When institutes are established their names are determined in Danish and English, as well as their organisational position within the University and their subject area.

(3) The dean may authorise an institute to be organised into departments for specific periods.

(4) Special rules apply to the Institute of Forensic Medicine pursuant to the executive order on institutes of forensic medicine.

(5) Each institute is managed by a head of institute. The dean performs the tasks of the head of institute in faculties that are not divided into institutes, cf. section 17 subsection (5) of the Universities Act. 

Boards of studies

Article 8. A number of boards of studies shall be established consisting of an equal number of representatives elected by and from among the academic staff and the students respectively. Boards of studies are responsible for the organisation, implementation and development of the degree programmes and teaching.

(2) The dean determines the structure of each faculty’s boards of studies.

(3) Each board of studies elects a chair, who arranges the board’s meetings in collaboration with the deputy chair. The board of studies submits a recommendation to the dean regarding the appointment of a director of studies from among the full-time academic members of staff. The director of studies is responsible for the practical organisation of teaching and examinations. The chair of the board of studies may also be the director of studies.

Academy councils

Article 9. An academy council shall be established for each faculty, cf. Article 21. The main task of the council is to ensure the academic freedom of the faculty.

Centres


Article 10. The Universities Act allows for the establishment of centres which constitute the formalised framework for partnerships whose purpose is to strengthen any particular area of research, teaching or communication.

(2) Centres resembling institutes whose head is given the competence of a head of institute are subject to the approval of the board, whereas other centres are subject to the approval of the rector or a dean on the authority of the rector.

Schools

Article 11. Subject to the approval of the Danish Minister for Education, the board may authorise a school for dental assistants, hygienists and clinical technicians to be associated with the University. Management of the school is subject to the approval of the rector, and takes place within a financial and administrative framework which is subject to the approval of the board.

Committees

Article 12. The rector may establish consulting committees.

Administration

Article 13. The rector has an administrative body at his/her disposal, managed by a director of administration.

(2) This administrative body serves managers and the collegiate bodies to the extent laid down following agreement with the rector.

Representative council

Article 14. The University and City Liaison Committee was founded in 1921 with a view to working to establish a university in Aarhus, and appointed members of the board of the University of Aarhus in the years 1928-1970.

(2) The 20-40 external members of the University and City Liaison Committee constitute the representative council of the University of Aarhus, cf. section 13 of the Universities Act. A chair of the representative council is elected by and from among its members.

(3) The representative council helps to appoint board members, cf. Article 17, and is kept informed of the University’s research, education and other activities, as well as discussing these activities on a general level.

Part 3 The board

Composition


Article 15. The board consists of a total of eleven members.

  • Six of these shall be from outside the University.
  • One member shall be elected by and from among the academic staff of the Faculties of Arts, Social Sciences and Theology.
  • One member shall be elected by and from among the academic staff of the Faculties of Health Sciences and Science.
  • One member shall be elected by and from among the University’s technical and administrative staff.
  • Two members shall be elected by and from among the University’s full-time students.

(2) The board shall elect a chair and substitute chair from among its members from outside the University.

Demands made on board members

Article 16. Board members shall help the University to fulfil its objectives by applying their collective experience of and insight into education, research, and the communication and exchange of knowledge.

(2) The appointed members shall collectively also possess experience of management, organisation and finance - including the evaluation of budgets and accounts.

(3) When appointing board members the emphasis shall be placed on ensuring that board members are familiar with - and that they respect - the traditions of Danish universities for autonomy, freedom of research and the inclusion of expert competencies in the decision-making process.

(4) When appointing board members the emphasis shall be placed on ensuring that board members can use their networks and influence to help strengthen the University’s legitimacy and reputation in the eyes of society.

(5) Board members shall be appointed based on their capacity as individuals, and the emphasis shall be placed on ensuring that one-sided representation of specific sectors or interests is prevented.

(6) The emphasis shall be placed on ensuring that the composition of the board makes it possible to enter into development contracts with the Ministry and create the framework required for the development and innovation of the University’s expertise and financial circumstances in a manner which is based on the core areas and core competencies of the University, and which reflects the breadth of expertise and development potentials of the University.

Appointment of external members

Article 17. No later than four months after the expiry of the functional period of the appointed members, the chair of the representative council shall set up an appointments council whose task is to appoint board members for the forthcoming period.

(2) The appointments council shall consist of six members: the chair of the representative council and one other member appointed by the representative council, the chair of the University board and one other member appointed by the board, and two members appointed from among the University’s academic staff.

(3) The appointments council obtains proposals for board members from the representative council, the present University board and other sources. The appointment of board members shall take place with due respect for the competence profile described in the Universities Act and Article 16 of these rules and regulations.

(4) The chair of the representative council is the chair of the appointments council. The decisions of the appointments council shall be made by a simple majority of votes. If an equal number of votes are cast for different candidates, the chair shall have the casting vote. Appointments are made in accordance with current administrative regulations.

(5) External members of the board are elected for a period of four years. Re-election is possible once.

Election of internal members


Article 18. The election of members to the board takes the form of an election between lists of candidates, with the option of entering into electoral pacts, in accordance with the general electoral rules of the University, cf. part 10.

(2) The rector is responsible for the way elections are held. The rector may set up an electoral committee and delegate tasks to its chair, cf. Article 49 (3).

(3) The representatives of the academic staff, including PhD students employed by the University, are elected by and from among the full-time staff (electoral group I) for a period of four years, corresponding to the functional period of the members appointed.

(4)  The representatives of the technical and administrative staff (electoral group III) are elected for a period of four years, corresponding to the functional period of the members appointed.

(5) The representatives of the students (electoral group IV) are elected for a period of one year.

(6) Re-election is possible, although the total functional period may not exceed eight years.

(7) If an elected member resigns from the board during his/her functional period and no substitute has been elected for this member, a new member shall be elected for the remainder of the functional period of the member concerned using the same regulations as those applying to the original election.

Tasks of the board


Article 19. The board has the following tasks:

  1. The board is the supreme authority of the University. The board protects the interests of the University as an institution of education and research, and lays down guidelines for its organisation, long-term activities and development, cf. section 10 subsection (1) of the Universities Act.
  2. The board is responsible to the Minister for the activities of the University, including the administration of the University’s overall resources, with a view ensuring that they are used to promote the University’s objectives as much as possible, cf. section 10 subsection (3) and section 11 subsection (1) of the Universities Act.
  3. The chair of the board is responsible for the administration of real property in collaboration with a member of the board, cf. section 10 subsection (4) of the Universities Act.
  4. On the recommendation of the rector, the board is responsible for approving the University’s budget, including the allocation of overall resources and the principles for investing these resources, and for signing the accounts, cf. Section 10 subsection (5) of the Universities Act.
  5. The board is responsible for approving new degree programmes, and for discontinuing degree programmes.
  6. The board draws up the University’s rules and regulations including any amendments, which are subject to the approval of the Minister cf. section 10 subsection (6) of the Universities Act.
  7. The board appoints and dismisses the rector, and appoints and dismisses the rest of the top management of the University on the recommendation of the rector, cf. section 10 subsection (7) of the Universities Act.
  8. The board enters into the University’s development contract with the Minister, cf. section 10 subsection (8) of the Universities Act.
  9. The board performs other tasks with which it is charged under the current regulations, including the rules and regulations of the trust fund. This also includes tasks allocated to the senate under the rules, until the rules concerned have been terminated or changed.
  10. The board lays down detailed guidelines concerning documentation systems for evaluations and follow-up on evaluations.

(2) The board has no authority in specific cases concerning University employees, apart from the rector and the other top management of the University, or concerning students, cf. section 10 subsection (9) of the Universities Act.

Work of the board

Article 20. Board meetings are public. However, cases may be processed behind closed doors if the nature of the case concerned or the circumstances in general render this necessary. All personal cases, cases including information about contract negotiations with private individuals or similar negotiations with public-sector partners, and cases covered by the stipulations of the Danish Administration Act ( forvaltningsloven ) concerning confidentiality, must be processed behind closed doors.

(2) The material distributed to the board for each meeting, including agendas and minutes, must be made publicly available. However, cases, documents and information covered by the rules of the Danish Administration Act on confidentiality must not be published. Cases processed behind closed doors cf. Article 20 (1) do not have to be made public if the nature of the case concerned or the circumstances in general render this necessary.

(3) By arrangement with the chair of the board, the rector will provide information concerning the work and decisions of the board.

(4) The board lays down its rules of procedure, which may include a procedure for holding board meetings.

Part 4 Academy councils

Article 21. An academy council shall be established for each faculty. On the recommendation of the present academy council, the rector decides the size and composition of the council for the forthcoming electoral period.

(2) Each academy council has at least eight members in addition to the chair. Student representatives constitute 25 per cent of the number of members excluding the chair. If the resulting figure is a fraction, it shall be rounded up to the next whole figure.

(3) A number of observers shall be elected to the academy council by and from among the technical-administrative staff. The number of observers may not exceed the number of students in the council.

(4) The dean is the automatic chair of the academy council.

(5) The following people may vote for and be elected to the academy councils: academic staff whose main employment is at the faculty, including salaried PhD students and students registered on full-time degree programmes at the faculty.

(6) Representatives of electoral group I and observers from electoral group III shall be elected for four years at a time. However, the first election period for electoral groups I and III ends at the same time as the election period of the board – i.e. 31 January 2008. Representatives of electoral group IV are elected for one year at a time. However, the first election period for electoral group IV ends on 31 January 2005.

(7) The rector may hold joint meetings with academy councils.

Article 22. Pursuant to section 15 subsection (2) of the Universities Act, academy councils perform the following tasks:

  1. Making statements to the dean concerning the internal allocation of grants.
  2. Making statements to the dean concerning central strategic areas of research and education and plans for the exchange of knowledge.
  3. Making recommendations to the dean concerning the composition of expert committees to assess applicants for academic positions.
  4. Awarding PhD degrees and doctorates.

(2) Pursuant to section 15 subsection (3) of the Universities Act, academy councils are entitled to make statements on all academic issues of major significance for the activities of the University, and must discuss all academic and financial issues presented by the dean.

Part 5 The rector and other top management

Appointment and dismissal

Article 23. The board appoints and dismisses the rector, and on the recommendation of the rector appoints and dismisses the prorector(s) and the director of administration, cf. section 10 subsection (7) of the Universities Act.

Article 24. The rector is appointed following external advertising pursuant to the current rules regarding advertising jobs for state employment. Appointments are made subject to the rules concerning appointments with limited tenure. The period of employment is five years, with a possible extension for up to three years. Reappointment for a new period is possible following external advertising.

(2) The rector must be a recognised researcher, cf. the Danish Act on research consulting ( lov om forskningsrådgivning ), within one of the University’s subject areas, and must have insight into the education sector. The rector must have experience of management and the organisation of research environments, as well as insight into the activities of a university and its interaction with the society around it.

(3) The appointments procedure is designed to ensure that the rector has professional and management legitimacy, cf. section 10 subsection (10) of the Universities Act. With this in mind, the procedure is arranged to ensure that general support can be expected from the University for the board’s decision regarding appointments to the position of rector.

(4) The appointments procedure may be performed by the entire board, or the board may set up an appointments committee involving a number of its members to draft an advertisement, select candidates for interview, carry out interviews, and submit a recommendation to the board for a successful candidate.

(5) The appointments committee mentioned in (4) above shall consist of the chair of the board and representatives of the external members of the board, the academic staff at the faculties of the Humanities, Social Sciences and Theology, the academic staff at the faculties of Health Sciences and Science, the technical and administrative staff, and the students.

(6) The board shall set up a consulting group consisting of a member of the academic staff from each of the five faculties, a member of the technical and administrative staff, and a student. The group will be briefed about the draft advertisement. The group will be briefed about the overall field of applicants. The group will be shown the relevant applications that have been received, and advises the board or appointments committee about which candidates should be invited to attend an interview.

(7) The decision to appoint must be made by the entire board, cf. Article 59 (3) and Article 20 (4).

(8) The board may terminate the rector’s employment pursuant to the regulations agreed and fixed by the Danish Ministry of Finance cf. section 29 subsection (1) of the Universities Act.

The rector’s tasks

Article 25. The rector represents the University. The rector is responsible for management of the University within the framework laid down by the board, cf. section 14 subsection (1) of the Universities Act.

(2) This means that the rector must:

  1. Make decisions in all cases not allocated to the board, academy councils or boards of studies under the Universities Act.
  2. Make recommendations to the board regarding the appointment and dismissal of prorectors and the director of administration.
  3. Appoint and dismiss deans.
  4. Submit the budget to the board and sign the accounts.
  5. Lay down rules regarding disciplinary measures for students.
  6. Sign for the University, apart from decisions concerning real property.
  7. Be responsible for approving all external partnerships of a binding nature for the University.

(3) The rector authorises the prorector, director of administration, deans, heads of institutes and directors of studies to act on behalf of the rector in their respective areas. The rector may also authorise other employees to act on behalf of the rector in particular areas. The rector may require a full-time member of the academic staff to assume a managerial position on a temporary basis.

(4) The rector may set up consulting committees cf. Article 12. The rector may ask boards of studies and academy councils to discuss and issue statements about topics of importance for the University.

Prorectors

Article 26. A prorector assists the rector in everyday management by arrangement with the rector. If several  prorectors are appointed, one of them shall function as the substitute for the rector and assume all the tasks and powers of the rector in the rector’s absence.

(2) Prorectors are appointed by the board on the recommendation of the rector.

(3) Article 24 (1-3) and (7) shall also apply when appointing prorectors.

(4) The rector appoints a consulting group consisting of one member of the academic staff from each of the five faculties, one member of the technical and administrative staff, and one student. The group will be informed of a draft advertisement for the position. The group will be informed of the entire field of applicants. The group will be shown relevant applications received, and will advise the rector regarding which applicants should be invited to attend an interview.

(5) The rector conducts interviews, and in this connection may seek internal or external advice.

(6) On the recommendation of the rector, the board may dismiss prorectors subject to the rules agreed and laid down by the Danish Ministry of Finance, cf. Section 29 subsection (1) of the Universities Act.

Director of administration

Article 27. The director of administration manages the University administration, cf. Article 13.

(2) The director of administration is appointed by the board on the recommendation of the rector.

(3) The director of administration is appointed following external advertising pursuant to the current rules regarding advertising for state employment. The director of administration must have experience of administration and management.

(4) The rector appoints a consulting group consisting of an administratively appointed employee from each of the five faculties and one from the joint University functions. The group will be informed of a draft advertisement for the position. The group will be informed of the entire field of applicants. The group will be shown relevant applications received, and will advise the rector regarding which applicants should be invited to attend an interview.

(5) The rector conducts interviews, and in this connection may seek internal or external advice.

(6) On the recommendation of the rector, the board may dismiss the director of administration subject to the rules agreed and laid down by the Danish Ministry of Finance, cf. Section 29 subsection (1) of the Universities Act.

Part 6 Deans

Appointment and dismissal

Article 28. The rector appoints and dismisses deans, cf. section 14 subsection (4) of the Universities Act.

(2) Deans are appointed following external advertising pursuant to the current rules regarding advertising for state employment. Appointment occurs pursuant to the rules regarding limited tenure. Appointments last five years and can be extended for a maximum of three years. Reappointment for a new period is possible following external advertising.

(3) The dean must be a recognised researcher (cf. Act on research consulting) within one of the faculty’s subject areas, and must have experience of and insight into education, management, and the interaction of a university with the society around it.

(4) The aim of the appointments procedure is to ensure that the dean has the required specialist and management legitimacy, cf. section 14 subsection (10) of the Universities Act. With this in mind, the procedure is arranged to ensure that general support for the rector’s decision regarding the appointment of a dean can be expected from the faculty.

(5) The rector appoints a consulting group consisting of one member of the academic staff from each of the faculty’s institutes, one member of the technical and administrative staff, and one student. The group will be informed of a draft advertisement for the position. The group will be informed of the entire field of applicants. The group will be shown relevant applications received, and will advise the rector regarding which applicants should be invited to attend an interview.

(6) The rector conducts interviews, and in this connection may seek internal or external advice.

(7) The rector may dismiss deans subject to the rules agreed and laid down by the Danish Ministry of Finance, cf. Section 29 subsection (1) of the Universities Act.

Tasks

Article 29. On the authority of the rector, the dean represents the faculty and deals with management of the main area.

(2) This means that the dean must:

  1. Ensure the links between the faculty’s research and education.
  2. Ensure the quality of the faculty’s education, teaching and research.
  3. Ensure interdisciplinary quality development of the faculty’s education and research.
  4. Appoint and dismiss heads of institutes.
  5. Appoint boards of studies.
  6. Be responsible for approving the chair and deputy chair of boards of studies.
  7. Appoint and dismiss directors of studies on the recommendation of boards of studies.
  8. Be responsible for approving academic regulations following proposals by the board of studies.
  9. Implement evaluations of the faculty’s degree programmes on a rota basis.
  10. Lay down general guidelines for credit approvals if necessary.

Prodeans

Article 30. The dean appoints and dismisses one or more prodeans, who are subject to the approval of the rector.

(2) Prodeans assist the dean in everyday management by arrangement with the dean.

(3) Prodeans must be recognised researchers within one of the faculty’s subject areas, and must have experience of and insight into education, management, and the interaction of a university with the society around it.

(4) The aim of the appointments procedure is to ensure that prodeans have specialist and management legitimacy.

Organisation

Article 31. The dean may authorise heads of institutes, directors of studies, administrative staff and  other employees of the faculty to act on behalf of the dean in certain areas.
Article 32. The dean must develop an organisation capable of performing the overall tasks of the main area, involving the academic staff, the technical and administrative staff and the students.

(2) The dean keeps the organisation informed on a regular basis regarding the affairs of the faculty, and consults the organisation when laying down general guidelines for the activities and development of the faculty, when drawing up the budget, and in other cases of importance for the faculty.

(3) The dean informs the rector about the structure of the organisation.

Article 33. The dean may appoint consulting bodies consisting of (or involving) external members.

Part 7 Heads of institute

Appointment and dismissal


Article 34. The dean appoints and dismisses heads of institute, cf. section 16 subsection (3) of the Universities Act.

(2) Heads of institute are appointed following external advertising pursuant to the current rules regarding advertising for state employment. Appointment occurs pursuant to the rules regarding limited tenure. Appointments last three years and can be extended for a maximum of three years. Reappointment for a new period is possible following external advertising.

(3) Heads of institute must have teaching experience, and must be recognised researchers (cf. Act on research consulting) within one of the institute’s subject areas or a subject area closely associated with the institute.

(4) The aim of the appointments procedure is to ensure that the head of institute has the required specialist and management legitimacy, cf. section 16 subsection (9) of the Universities Act. With this in mind, the procedure is arranged to ensure that general support for the dean’s decision regarding the appointment of a head of institute can be expected from the institute.

(5) The dean appoints a consulting group consisting of two-three members of the academic staff, one member of the technical and administrative staff, and one student. The group will be informed of a draft advertisement for the position. The group will be informed of the entire field of applicants. The group will be shown relevant applications received, and will advise the dean regarding which applicants should be invited to attend an interview.

(6) The dean conducts interviews, and in this connection may seek internal or external advice.

(7) The dean may dismiss heads of institute subject to the rules agreed and laid down by the Danish Ministry of Finance, cf. Section 29 subsection (1) of the Universities Act.

Organisation

Article 35. The head of institute must develop an organisation capable of performing the overall tasks of the institute, cf. Articles 36-38.

Article 36. The head of institute appoints and dismisses one or more deputy heads of institute. The aim of the appointments procedure is to ensure that deputy heads of institute have the required specialist and management legitimacy, cf. Article 34 (4). Deputy heads of institute are subject to the approval of the dean. Deputy heads of institute assist the head of institute in everyday management by arrangement with the head of institute.

(2) If an institute is organised into departments, cf. Article 7 (3), the head of institute appoints a head of department for each department after a hearing involving the department. The head of institute may authorise the head of department to make everyday management decisions in specific cases or groups of cases.

(3) The head of institute may appoint heads of research and delegate specific management tasks to them.

(4) The head of institute may appoint committees.

Article 37. The organisation also includes a council which the head of institute may consult when laying down general guidelines for the activities and development of the institute and in other cases of importance for the institute.

(2) The council must include representatives of the various sections of the institute, the various groups of staff and students, and the various work functions. Apart from the head of institute, the academic staff occupy 50 per cent of the seats, the technical and administrative staff 25 per cent of the seats, and the students 25 per cent of the seats.

(3) The head of institute informs the dean of the composition of the council.

Article 38. The head of institute may appoint consulting bodies consisting of (or involving) external members.

Tasks and authority

Article 39. The head of institute represents the institute, and on the authority of the rector and dean deals with the specialist, financial and staff management of the institute, including planning and allocating tasks, cf. section 17 of the Universities Act.

(2) This means that the head of institute must:

  • Ensure the quality and development of the institute’s research and teaching.
  • Ensure the links between the institute’s research and teaching.
  • Be responsible for evaluating the institute’s teaching and following up on this.
  • Be responsible for following up on evaluations of the degree programmes within the institute’s area implemented on the initiative of bodies outside the institute.

(3) The head of institute’s follow-up on evaluations of the degree programmes and teaching involves the board of studies and director of studies. The head of institute may delegate tasks to the director of studies.

Part 8 Directors of studies

Appointment and dismissal

Article 40. The dean defines the areas of responsibility of the directors of studies in relation to the structure of the board of studies.

(2) The dean appoints and dismisses directors of studies on the recommendation of the board(s) of studies affected, cf. section 16 subsection (5) of the Universities Act. The director of studies must be appointed from among the full-time academic staff. Appointments last for periods of three years.

Tasks

Article 41. Pursuant to section 18 subsection (5) of the Universities Act, the director of studies is responsible for the practical organisation of the teaching, examinations and other forms of assessment involved in examination in cooperation with the board of studies and within the framework of the academic regulations .

(2) The director of studies assists the head of institute in following up on evaluations of the degree programmes and teaching.

(3) The director of studies is responsible for student guidance in the subject.

(4) The director of studies makes recommendations to the head of institute or dean regarding the appointment and dismissal of temporary lecturers, student instructors and student counsellors. Student counsellors are appointed after a hearing involving the board of studies.

Part 9 Boards of studies

Formation and disbanding

Article 42. Boards of studies are formed and disbanded by the dean concerned after a hearing involving the institutes affected. Boards of studies may be formed for specific degree programmes, academic regulations or areas of study.

(2) Boards of studies consist of an equal number of representatives of the academic staff and students respectively, although the maximum number of members is 18. The number of members is determined by the dean when boards of studies are formed, and may be changed after a hearing involving the board of studies concerned.

(3) When determining the number of members and (when necessary) dividing into areas of representation, the specialist scope of the degree programmes covered by the teaching shall be taken into account.

Voting rights and eligibility

Article 43. Following a proposal by the dean, who asks the board of studies in question, the board decides whether part-time teachers should have voting rights and eligibility, and if so whether they should constitute a separate area of representation. The election circular described in Article 50 shows which groups have voting rights and eligibility.

(2) After a hearing involving the board of studies in question, the dean decides whether students on part-time degree programmes should have voting rights and eligibility, and if so whether they should constitute a separate area of representation.

(3) Salaried PhD students included in the group of full-time academic staff (electoral group I) are regarded as students when forming PhD boards of studies.

Article 44. Representatives of the academic staff on boards of studies are elected for three years at a time by and from among the teachers teaching within the area of the board of studies concerned.

(2) At least half of the teacher representatives must be full-time academic staff.

(3) The student representatives on the boards of studies are elected for one year at a time by and from among the students studying within the area of the board of studies concerned.

Chair, deputy chair and substitutes

Article 45. The board of studies elects a chair for one year at a time who may also be the director of studies. The chair is elected from among the full-time academic staff who are members of the board of studies.

(2) A substitute is elected from among the same group of people and for the same period who shall assume the tasks and powers of the chair in the absence of the chair.

(3) The board of studies elects a deputy chair from among its student members. The deputy chair takes part in arranging the work of the board of studies.

(4) The elected chair, substitute and deputy chair are subject to the approval of the dean.

Tasks

Article 46. Pursuant to section 18 subsection (6) of the Universities Act, boards of studies are responsible for the organisation, implementation and development of degree programmes and teaching, including:

  1. Quality assurance and quality development of degree programmes and teaching, and follow-up on evaluations of degree programmes and teaching.
  2. Drawing up proposals for academic regulations and amendments.
  3. Approving plans for the organisation of teaching, examinations and other assessments included in examinations.
  4. Making decisions on applications for credit and dispensation.
  5. Issuing statements on proposals for general guidelines for student guidance within the area of the board of studies concerned, and on the appointment and dismissal of student counsellors.
  6. Making recommendations for the appointment and dismissal of director(s) of studies to the dean.
  7. Issuing statements in their areas in all cases of importance for degree programmes and teaching, including general rules on degree programmes and teaching, and discussing issues relating to degree programmes and teaching which the rector or anyone so empowered by the rector presents to them.

(2) The dean may lay down guidelines for dealing with cases under Article 46 (1) point 4.

Part 10 Electoral rules

Rules for individual bodies

Article 47. The rules regarding the length of electoral periods, voting rights and eligibility for the various bodies are laid down in Articles 18, 21, 43 and 44.

Date of election, deadlines, assumption of office

Article 48. Ordinary elections are held in the autumn semester. When deciding who has voting rights and eligibility, 1 October is used as the deadline. Elected bodies assume office on 1 February.

Organisation

Article 49. The rector is responsible for ensuring that elections are held.

(2) The rector lays down detailed rules about elections and the necessary deadlines, and is responsible for organising and holding elections to the board, academy councils and boards of studies. The rector decides whether elections should be centralised or decentralised.

(3) The rector may appoint an election committee including representatives of the academic staff, technical and administrative staff and students. The rector appoints the chair of such committees, and may authorise the chair to perform tasks in accordance with this part 10 on behalf of the rector.

Election circular


Article 50. The University draws up an election circular containing the most important rules for elections. The election circular is announced publicly and in any other appropriate fashion.

(2) Among other things, the election circular must contain rules about:

  • The individual bodies, electoral areas and number of mandates.
  • The length of electoral periods.
  • Voting rights and eligibility.
  • The time when electoral registers must be submitted.
  • Deadline for objections to electoral registers.
  • Rules and deadlines for nomination of candidates and lists.
  • Deadline for any register/electoral pacts.
  • Time for publication of candidate nominations.
  • Deadline for objections to candidate nominations.
  • Date/time of election.
  • Voting method.
  • Voting venues.
  • Counting of votes.
  • Time for announcement of election results.
  • Deadline for complaints about elections.

Electoral groups

Article 51. Electors are divided into five electoral groups:

Electoral group I (full-time academic staff and teachers) comprises staff employed for 18½ hours a week or more in positions covered by the ministry’s note on employment structure for academic staff, and not defined as part-time positions in the note. Clinical professors and clinical associate professors of medicine, and clinical teachers of odontology including staff dentists employed for at least 15 hours a week are regarded as the equivalent of full-time academic staff whose main job is at the University.

Electoral group II (part-time academic staff and teachers) comprises other staff covered by the ministry’s note on employment structure for academic staff whose position comprises at least 100 salaried hours in the semester in which the election is called, or 200 salaried hours in all within the academic year in question.

Electoral group III (technical and administrative staff) comprises all technical and ad­ministrative staff with agreed working hours of at least 18½ hours per week.

Electoral group IV (students) comprises students registered on full-time degree programmes at the University. PhD students not belonging to electoral group I owing to their terms of employment have the same voting rights and eligibility as students. 

Electoral group V (part-time students) comprises students registered on part-time degree programmes at the University.

Electoral registers, voting rights and eligibility

Article 52. The rector draws up electoral registers of those entitled to vote. The electoral registers are presented for inspection to allow objections to be made before a specific deadline. After the expiry of the period allowed for objections, nobody can require any changes in the electoral registers; but for as long as practically possible, the rector may correct any actual mistakes in the registers.

(2) Anyone belonging to one of the groups mentioned in Article 51 on 1 October and at the time the election is held, providing that they feature in the electoral register, is entitled to vote and eligible for election to collegiate bodies to the extent outlined in Articles 18, 21, 43 and 44.

Electoral areas

Article 53. The electoral area for each electoral group corresponds to the areas of the body in question unless anything else is specified in (2) below.

(2) On the recommendation of a dean, the rector may decide that an electoral area for an academy council or one of the faculty boards of study should be divided into areas of representation.

(3) Voting rights and eligibility only apply within a single electoral group, for one of several coordinated collegiate bodies, and within a single electoral area. However, in special circumstances the rector may give the same person voting rights and eligibility for several coordinated bodies. Anyone linked to several different areas is entitled to state within a specified deadline where they wish to exercise their voting rights and eligibility. If no such statement is made the rector decides where voting rights should be exercised.

Electoral system etc.

Article 54. Elections employ the system of proportional representation between registers, and register/electoral pacts are permitted. Elections are settled using the divisors 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 etc.

(2) Votes are cast in the same way as at general elections. However, the rector may decide that elections should be decided by postal vote. All elections are by secret ballot, in writing. The rector may also decide that votes should be cast electronically if the necessary facilities (including security provisions) are in place. However, it must be possible to cast votes without the use of electronic communication.

(3) There are no limits regarding re-election to collegiate bodies, apart from Article 18 (6) regarding the board. 

Official duty to participate

Article 55. Members of electoral groups I and III may not refuse nomination for election to a collegiate body. However, nobody can be forced against their will to join a register of candidates including candidates other than themselves. 

(2) If it is discovered when counting the votes that the required number of employees in electoral groups I and III has not been elected in any electoral area, the rector will arrange for the drawing of lots among the unelected members of the group in the electoral area immediately after the election has been held and before the results have been announced, to determine who should be elected to the collegiate body in question and who should be their substitutes (the rector decides how many of these there should be). Similar rules will be observed if no candidates are nominated for election in the area concerned. Employees who are either elected or chosen by drawing lots have an official duty to join the body concerned and take part in its work.

Complaints

Article 56. Complaints in connection with elections that have been held shall be submitted in writing to the rector within a specific deadline, cf. Article 49.

Resignations and by-elections

Article 57. Members who no longer comply with the terms of eligibility within their electoral group shall resign from the body/bodies in which they have a seat. If they take leave of absence, the rector may decide that they should only resign during the period of leave.

(2) If a vacancy in a collegiate body arises during the election period and not enough substitutes have been elected or nominated in the ordinary election to ensure that the collegiate body in question is plenary, the rector decides (normally on the recommendation of the collegiate body in question) whether the vacant seat(s) should be filled by a by-election or whether this can wait until the next ordinary election, but see Article 18 (7) on the board.

(3) In by-elections the election area is the same as that of ordinary elections, and the terms of the election circular also apply.

(4) If there are any changes in the organisation of the University during an election period, the mandates in any bodies that are discontinued are removed and any necessary new elections are held for the remainder of the election period.

Part 11 Procedure of collegiate bodies

Meetings

Article 58. The term “collegiate bodies” in these rules and regulations means the board, academy council and boards of study.

Article 59. Collegiate bodies perform their duties at meetings. The venue and time of ordinary meetings are fixed by the body itself. Extraordinary meetings must be held if the chair deems this necessary, or if required by one-third of the members of the body concerned. If all the members agree, cases can be settled by dealing with them in writing.

(2) The chair draws up a proposed agenda and ensures that the members are provided with the necessary information to assess cases. The deputy chair of each board of study takes part in arranging the work of the board of study, including drawing up proposed agendas. The members of the body may require that specific proposals are included in the agenda.

(3) Collegiate bodies have a quorum when at least half the prescribed number of members are present. In the absence of any rules to the contrary, decisions are made by a simple majority of votes cast by those present.

(4) Members must inform the chair of their collegiate organ in case of any doubts regarding their legal competence to act. The body then decides whether the member concerned may take part in processing the case in question.

Information about meetings

Article 60. Information about the time, place and agenda of meetings in collegiate bodies is published in good time prior to meetings as far as possible.

(2) Meetings of collegiate bodies are public. However, cases may be dealt with behind closed doors if deemed necessary due to their nature or general circumstances. All personal cases, cases involving information about contractual negotiations with private individuals or similar negotiations with public partners, and cases covered by the terms of the Danish Administration Act regarding confidentiality must be dealt with behind closed doors. In cases of a confidential nature, members and observers must observe confidentiality pursuant to the regulations of the Danish Administration Act.

(3) Agendas and appendices for collegiate body meetings must be publicly available pursuant to the regulations of the Danish Administration Act. The chair of each body is responsible for ensuring that the body makes active efforts to inform people of its activities.

(4) Collegiate body decisions are recorded in minutes which are presented to the members for approval. Any member may require that their own views are included in the minutes. In cases which are to be submitted to other authorities, the member concerned may require that the reasons for their views are also enclosed. Approved minutes of collegiate body meetings are published providing that they are not covered by the duty of confidentiality.

Substitutes

Article 61. If elected members of collegiate organs lose their eligibility during an election period, or are found to be legally incompetent to act, or are unable to take part in the work of their collegiate body due to lengthy absence owing to illness, study trips etc., substitutes will take their place. The chair decides whether the circumstances require a substitute to be called.

Rules of procedure

Article 62. The rector draws up standard rules of procedure for academy councils and boards of study. Each body draws up its own rules of procedure within the framework of the University’s rules and regulations and standard rules of procedure.

Part 12 General terms

Liaison committees


Article 63. The rector ensures that liaison committees are established at the University in accordance with current regulations.

(2) The liaison committees receive information about and discuss:

  • Working and staff conditions, including equal opportunities, in-service training, and rationalisation and retraining projects,
  • The introduction of new technology or changes in existing technology,
  • The University’s financial situation.

(3) The liaison committees have the right to be consulted when laying down guidelines for working and staff conditions within their area.

Procedural pathways

Article 64. Approaches to relevant ministerial departments and other authorities by collegiate bodies, deans, heads of institute and directors of studies are processed by the rector or the person authorised by the rector. Approaches by institutes and boards of studies are forwarded via the dean.

(2) Special rules apply to the Institute of Forensic Medicine pursuant to the executive order on institutes of forensic medicine. Statements from this Institute in connection with forensic examinations do not have to pass through the rector’s office.

Amendments of rules and regulations

Article 65. These rules and regulations can be amended by the board. Proposals shall be drawn up by the rector. Amendments of the rules and regulations are subject to the approval of the Minister.

Part 13 Financial issues, etc.

Subsidies for student activities


Article 66. To a reasonable extent the University will cover expenses and make facilities available for activities connected with student politics. To a limited extent the University may cover expenses and make facilities available for other student activities. 

Grants and gifts


Article 67. The University may receive grants and gifts from sources not included in the appropriation acts.

(2) The University may set up trust funds for gifts if the donor so requires.

Investment of funds


Article 68. The University’s liquid funds shall be invested in accordance with the Danish Ministry of Justice’s executive order on the investment of liquid funds and board fees etc. 

Signing for the University


Article 69. The rector is empowered to sign on behalf of the University, but see (2) below.

(2) The chair of the board and a member of the board jointly are empowered to sign on behalf of the University in transactions involving real property.

Accounts and auditing


Article 70. The University is covered by the Act on state accounting (lov om statens regnskabsvæsen). The accounts shall be drawn up pursuant to rules established by the Minister.

(2) The University’s accounting year is the fiscal year. At the end of the accounting year the annual accounts shall be drawn up, comprising a profit and loss account, balance sheet and list of fixed assets. The accounts must be signed by the board and the rector. 

(3) The University’s accounts shall be audited by the Auditor-General pursuant to the Act on auditing state accounts etc. ( lov om revisionen af statens regnskaber mv. ).

(4) The Auditor-General and the Minister may agree that the tasks of auditing should be dealt with in a defined partnership involving the Auditor-General and an institutional auditing firm. The institutional audit shall be performed by a chartered or registered accountant. 

Official tasks

Article 71. If the University is amalgamated with a sector research institution, it will deal with its official tasks by agreement with the relevant ministry and subject to the necessary grant from the ministry.

Discontinuation of the University


Article 72. If the board decides to discontinue the University as an independent institution, its net capital shall be transferred to the state. Any decision regarding discontinuation is subject to the approval of the Minister.

(2) Gifts given to the University of Aarhus as an independent institution or former state institution shall not be transferred to the state in accordance with (1) above. Such gifts shall be distributed in accordance with approved fund rules and regulations, or the wishes of the donor, or (if the donor has expressed no such wishes) they shall be allocated to the objectives specified in the rules and regulations applying to the independent University at any time. 

Part 14 Approval and application

Article 73. These rules and regulations come into force when they have been approved by the Minister.

(2) The special rules and regulations of the University of Aarhus approved by the Minister for Science, Technology and Innovation on 3 October 2003 shall be discontinued at the same time, as well as the statute for the University of Aarhus approved by the Ministry of Research on 9 November 1999.

Approved at a meeting of the board on 31 August 2004

Jens Bigum
chair of the board

Approved by the Minister for Science, Technology and Innovation on 10 September 2004
Helge Sander

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