News archive

2012.11.30 | Grants

DKK 60 million for research centre devoted to well-being among children and young people

With a grant of DKK 60 million, the TrygFonden foundation has taken the initiative to establish a new research centre at Aarhus University. The centre is to lead the way in proving that it is possible to build up a solid base of knowledge about what does and does not work with regard to improving the well-being of children and young people. The…

2012.11.28 | Research

Help for European children to resist unhealthy temptations

It is easy for children and teenagers in Europe to get their hands on sweets and other unhealthy foods. A major European research project has therefore developed a range of tools that children and teenagers can use to ward off temptation.

2012.11.27 | Research

New method for diagnosing malaria

Danish researchers have developed a new and sensitive method that makes it possible to diagnose malaria from a single drop of blood or saliva. The method might eventually be used in low-resource areas without the need for specially trained personnel, expensive equipment, clean water or electricity. With the development of this method, the…

2012.11.26 | Research

Developing healthy snacks. Is it possible?

New research from Aarhus University, School of Business and Social Sciences shows that healthy snacks may outcompete unhealthy alternatives if the products are cool and combine the healthy with the unhealthy.

2012.11.19 | Research

Greenland's viking settlers gorged on seals

Greenland's viking settlers, the Norse, disappeared suddenly and mysteriously from Greenland about 500 years ago. Natural disasters, climate change and the inability to adapt have all been proposed as theories to explain their disappearance. But now a Danish-Canadian research team has demonstrated the Norse society did not die out due to an…

Researchers at Aarhus University have played an important role in the mapping of the pig genome. The results have far-reaching practical implications for pig research and breeding and are an important building block for research into human diseases.

2012.11.15 | Research

The genetic code of the pig has been broken

Researchers at Aarhus University have played an important role in the mapping of the pig genome. The results have far-reaching practical implications for pig research and breeding and are an important building block for research into human diseases.

2012.11.14 | Research

Mercury poisoning ruled out as cause of Tycho Brahe's death

In 2010, Tycho Brahe was exhumed from his grave in Prague, an event which received extensive international media coverage. Since then, a Danish-Czech team of researchers has been working to elucidate the cause of Tycho Brahe's death. The results of this intensive work now make it possible to rule out mercury poisoning as a cause of death.

2012.11.13 | Research

Brief mindfulness improves brains ability to focus

Aarhus University study finds brief mindfulness improves brains ability to focus while greater practice required to train emotion.

2012.11.12 | Public

Democracy version 2.0

Aarhus will be in focus this weekend when the international worlds of architecture and art join forces with world-leading scientists and top names in the technology industry. The aim is to push democracy into the next century.

“Sensseed” is capable of measuring moisture and temperature in grains and seeds. Through this, shrinkage in warehouses might be significantly reduced. Photo: Webstech

2012.11.14 | Awards

AU research wins engineering publisher's top prize

A crop storage sensor that can assist in the reduction of losses in warehouses has won publishing house Ingeniøren's main prize, the “product prize 2012”. The sensor stems from the research environment at Aarhus University.

2012.11.02 | Research

Size of biceps influences men's political attitudes

Physically strong men are more likely to act in their own financial self-interest than physically weaker men when it comes to redistribution of wealth. This is the finding of new, extensive study by Aarhus University, School of Business and Social Sciences.

2012.11.01 | Research

Plants recognise pathogenic and beneficial microorganisms

In collaboration with national and international experts, researchers from Aarhus University have revealed new fundamental features of biomolecular interactions that enable plants to identify and respond appropriately to microorganisms. This could have implications for future sustainable agriculture, where useful microorganisms are increasingly…